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Commercial success at Heesen: YN 18750 Project Aster is sold!

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YN 18750 Project Aster
YN 18750 Project Aster

YN 18750 – also known as Project Aster – started on speculation and is currently seven months away from delivery. This is the third contract signed in 2018 for a total of 190 linear meters and, even more impressively, 3,259 Gross Tons!
The short delivery time, the impressive top speed of 23 knots and the renowned Dutch quality attracted Project Aster’s new Owners, who are fine yacht connoisseurs. 
Thanks to its 40 years of experience, Heesen is able to build aluminium hulls to enormously demanding tolerances. The in-house team of engineers and skilled welders have created a very slippery semi-displacement hull, that powered with two MTU 16V 4000 engines will deliver not only speed, but also efficiency and a smooth ride in any and all sea conditions. Aster is a true blue-water motor yacht, with a transatlantic range of 3,100 nm at the cruising speed of 11 knots. 
At 50 metres and below 500GT, Aster perfectly combines performance, comfort, space and refined luxury. Her exterior lines by Frank Laupman of Omega Architects embody Heesen’s DNA: the pelican beak bow with reverse sheer and the sporty mast give Project Aster a very distinctive look. 
Cristiano Gatto created an interior design that celebrates the lineage of her foresisters.
A broad variety of materials and finishes characterise Project Aster’s interior design, complementing her quiet and serene ambience. Although the design shies away from over- embellishment, the richness and the variety of luxurious details are easy to see. In this elegant design, Cristiano has found perfection in simplicity. The versatile layout comprises five lower deck suites and a master stateroom on the main deck forward, with the capacity for twelve guests serviced by nine crew.
Project Aster will be delivered to her new Owners in June 2019 after rigorous sea trials in the North Sea.