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Vendée Globe: Le Cléac'h's Islands Route in Light Airs

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Le Cléac'h's Islands Route in Light Airs
Le Cléac'h's Islands Route in Light Airs

Le Cléac'h's Islands Route in Light Airs

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Due to the light westerly winds which have been with him since he rounded Cape Horn, the Vendée Globe leader Armel Le Cléac'h has taken a passage close to some of the small islands of Tierra del Fuego and this morning is passing just seven miles to the east of Isla de los Estados (Staten Island from the Dutch Stateneiland).

 

The pacemaker has had a relatively slow 12 hours, with boat speeds down to 4-5kts at times, apparently seeking out extra breeze closer to the land. He has decided to pass east of the island and not through the Le Maire Straits. Meantime British challenger Alex Thomson (Hugo Boss) is on his favoured starboard gybe, since tacking yesterday afternoon, and is now in 20kts of S'ly becoming SW'ly breeze and has been averaging 17kts. Consequently Thomson has made back 60 miles or so on Le Cléac'h overnight and should continue to gain. He is still on schedule to pass Cape Horn during the afternoon of the 25th.

Four sailors are expected to round the Horn by next Friday. 1600 miles behind Armel Le Cléac'h, Jérémie Beyou (3rd on Maître CoQ) is sailing in a nortehrly wind, which is pushing him along at almost twenty knots. Jérémie should continue to take advantage of fine conditions in the days ahead. There will be a gybe to do on Sunday evening or Sunday night and he is expected to pass Cape Horn at midday on Tuesday. Still in fourth place Jean-Pierre Dick (StMichelVirbac) can see Yann Eliès (Quéguiner Leucémie Espoir) and Jean Le Cam (Finistère Mer Vent) catching him. All three were becalmed in a wind hole last night. Jean-Pierre should be the first to pick up some more wind, while Yann and Jean will have to wait until this evening to get going again. The gap is therefore likely to open up again. Dick is expected to reach Cape Horn on Thursday with Eliès and Le Cam there the following day…

Louis Burton (Bureau Vallée) is continuing to race well in the middle of the Pacific. It is however going to be a tricky day with an area of low pressure moving down towards him. This morning he is likely to feel the effects of a N/NE'ly air stream blowing up to 40 knots… In the middle of this low, Nandor Fa (Spirit of Hungary) will be in calm conditions all day. He will cross the International Date Line today at around 0900hrs UTC. In fact that means the Hungarian skipper will miss out on having Christmas twice only by a matter of two or three hours. Conditions are set to become rougher for the Hungarian in around 36 hours with a windy end to Christmas Day.

Life is great for Conrad Colman (Foresight Natural Energy), the fastest in the fleet over the past 24 hours (sailing 351.5 miles). He will be passing to the south of New Zealand, where he was born. Further back, six skippers are about to enter the Pacific and cross the halfway point. Arnaud Boissières (La Mie Câline), Eric Bellion (CommeUnSeulHomme) and Alan Roura (La Fabrique) are within twenty miles of each other. Eric Bellion has made up for his penalty of one hour after breaking the seal on his mooring chain. Boissières, Bellion and Roura are making the most of a manageable NW'ly wind. But as Eric Bellion explained this morning, they will be slowing down to let the worst of a low-pressure system go by between New Zealand and the Antarctic Exclusion Zone. These three, as well as Irishman, Enda O'Coineen (Kilcullen Voyager Team Ireland) will be entering the Pacific this afternoon. Slightly further back than the others, Rich Wilson (Great American IV) and Fabrice Amedeo (NewrestMatmut) will be leaving the Indian tomorrow. There has been a slight change at the rear of the fleet, as Didac Costa (One Planet One Ocean) has overtaken Pieter Heerema (No Way Back). The Spaniard and Dutchman are in strong winds on heavy seas less than 200 miles from Cape Leeuwin. Romain Attanasio (Famille Mary Etamine du Lys) and Sébastien Destremau (TechnoFirstfaceOcean) are more than 500 miles further back.

 

QUOTES

 

Conrad Colman (Foresight Natural Energy):

“The weather will continue to be comfortable, at least on the southern ocean scale of possibility, until after I am clear of the sunny summer holiday celebrations going on in my birth country of New Zealand but as Kiwis will be digesting on the beach I'll be gearing up for another battle royale with a huge big depression on the 28th. With 45 knots forecasted in the middle and gusts that can be 20% over that, it looks like a nasty piece of work. However I have plenty of time to prepare and position myself out of the firing line. Now that I've come to enjoy 30kts of wind I don't need give myself occasion to get used to 50!”

Nandor Fa (Spirit of Hungary):

“I was just thinking about how one learns to live much more economically out here. You only move as much as you have to and you use just enough of everything, only the amount necessary. This relates to everything including water, toilet paper, tissues, sometimes I even limit my thoughts so that I don't over-think for no reason. I decided to take down the broken reacher. I fought with the task, it took serious energies from me. The major issue is that its structure is coming apart because it's a very old sail. This is the second one of my sails, whose career has come to an end. I was hoisting the A3, when I saw that we were about to pass Campbell island. Tactically, the coming days are going to be difficult, and we are going to go slower until the 27th.

Then I'm supposed to have another train to get on. Until then: patience and a lot of work.”

Eric Bellion (CommeUnSeulHomme):

“Taking part in the Vendée Globe was with the aim of finding harmony between three elements: me, the boat and the sea. That harmony is gradually being achieved. I didn't decide at any one point to go faster. It just happened naturally. I feel more and more at ease on my boat. Gradually I don't feel as apprehensive. I'm more relaxed and that means I can accelerate. My boat didn't suffer any damage in the first half, although I remain cautious. I'm slowing down for now, as there is a nasty low coming down from Tasmania.”

 

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